Camera Colour Space Setting

CIE1931_HumanEyeColourSpectrumColour Space is simply a definition of reproducible colours, typically shown on a graph in relation to the human eye. The four (4) most common colour spaces are; sRGB, Adobe RGB, CMYK, and ProPhoto RGB.

sRGB is the colour space used for images on the internet and for digital displays (monitors) and represents about 50% of the range or colours that the human eye can see. sRGB is the most common (default) colour space used by photo labs for producing prints.

Typically, any camera which only shoot Jpeg images will not have a choice of colour space setting in the camera and defaults to sRGB.

A camera that has the ability to shoot in RAW will typically provide the ability to choose between sRGB or Adobe RGB. As seen in the diagram Adobe RGB covers a wider range of colours than sRGB and covers a range about 75% of what the human eye can see.

It is always best to set the camera to the highest quality colour space setting , Adobe RGB, to maximize the amount of colour information in your captured images. The conversion to sRGB for printing takes place during image exporting using post processing software. It is important to note, if you do not use post processing software the colour space setting should be set to sRGB to allow for proper printing and displaying of your images.

On a Canon T6i the setting, refer to page 146 in the manual,  is located in the camera menu under the second camera tab. Select Color space, then choose Adobe RGB if you use post processing software otherwise choose sRGB.

On a Nikon D5100 the setting, refer to page 10 in the manual. Start by pressing the menu button, then select shooting menu, choose color space and then select Adobe RGB if you use post processing software otherwise choose sRGB.

In our next lesson we will discuss setting the camera’s image resolution.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s