About tgawalt

I am a photographer growing as an artist associated with Dream Imagine Believe Photography and You Can Learn Photography.

Episode 7 – Nancy Rose, Hubley Nova Scotia

Podcast Episode #7 – Feb 15, 2022

In this podcast interview we will be talking to Nancy Rose, a photographer, author and illustrator best known for her book series “The Secret Life of Squirrels” currently based in Hubley, Nova Scotia.

You Can Learn Photography Podcast Episode 7 Nancy Rose (mp3)
©Nancy Rose

Nancy worked as a Guidance Counselor and Family Studies teacher until she retired in 2016. Nancy grew up in Antigonish, NS, in a family of seven children where creativity was always encouraged and over the years she has pursued a variety of art and craft endeavors in her spare time. She started taking photography seriously in 2007 when she joined Flickr.com where she was inspired by the creativity and talents of photographers from all over the world. Her interest in nature and wildlife, and a storage room full of fabrics, paint, clay and craft materials merged with her photography passion when she discovered the curiosity of the little North American Red Squirrels who raided the bird feeders in her backyard. By making miniature dioramas and squirrel-size props she has created hundreds of scenarios where the inquisitive squirrels find themselves in some rather human-like poses as they search for peanuts hidden in the props. Gradually, the “secret life” of her backyard squirrels emerged. Her first “actor”, Mr. Peanuts, has been followed by a succession of cute and curious squirrels who come daily for peanuts and sunflower seeds and to check out whatever Nancy puts out on the table on her deck. Sometimes she gets a good shot right away, but more often it takes hundreds of photos to get a clearly focused shot that tells the story Nancy has in her head.

In 2013 Nancy’s humorous squirrel photos on Flickr went viral and they have been featured on numerous websites, and newspapers locally and internationally, as well as on local and national television news shows. When some of her amusing squirrel photos appeared in The Toronto Star and National Post she was contacted by a literary agent at Westwood Creative Artists in Toronto. From there her books were born and her followers grew in number. Her fifth book was published in June 2021.

Nancy’s first book, The Secret Life of Squirrels was published simultaneously in Canada and the US in 2014 and has also been published in Japan and South Korea. It is also available in a board book for the youngest readers, and in 2016 available in paperback through Scholastic Books. Merry Christmas, Squirrels followed in 2015, The Secret Life of Squirrels: A Love Story in 2016, and The Secret Life of Squirrels: Back to School in 2018. Oakley the Squirrel – The Search for Z – A Nutty Alphabet Book came out in June 2021 and a follow up about Counting and Camping is at the publishers now. Nancy is currently working on a fourth year of photos (for 2024) calendars with Workman Publishing.

Nancy does classroom visits (live, before covid) and virtual these days, via Zoom or Googlemeet. She is available to read to students of all ages. “I can talk about the roles of author and illustrator and working with a publisher. I show many of my homemade miniature props which appear in the books to show the students that art has many forms. We talk about nature and wildlife, crafting and recycling (The 3 R’s) and the 4 P’s: photography, practice, patience and persistence. After my visits students have often created their own miniatures and written stories to go with them.”

You can follow Nancy’s work and learn more at:
secretlifeofsquirrels.com
facebook.com/nancy.rose.1042
instagram.com/nancyroselovessquirrels/
flickr.com/photos/nancyandwayne/

Some Youtube Links:
Merry Christmas Squirrels! by Nancy Rose (Little, Brown Young Readers)
Merry Christmas Squirrels! read by Patti Smith (321 Read)
The Secret Life of Squirrels read by Mr. Kirby’s Neighborhood
Squirrel with tissues Nancy Rose “Secret Life of Squirrels”

From your podcast app click on this link to the images which will automatically use your browser.

The Music snippets that you hear in the intro and outro of the podcast is from “upbeat-motivation-corporate” by M-Dewala on Pixabay Music.

February Theme Challenge – “Winter Scene”

I apologize for posting this months challenge later than hoped, due to recent computer upgrades. For this month, February 2022, the theme challenge is “Winter Scene”. The content here is similar to the Feb 2020 challenge of Snow, Frost, or Ice.

Taking photographs in the cold weather has it’s challenges; keeping yourself warm and comfortable, being careful not to fall, and keeping your gear free from condensation are all important things to consider before going out. See below after the sample images to get tips on equipment cold weather care and proper exposure to get your snow white.

Snow and can create dreamy conditions and it can help remove distractions in the landscape. Go around your area and create some images of the conditions where you live. You can even take a few of the images and create a collage depicting winter life in your community.

With ice it’s a matter of catching the right light and angle to make your images more interesting. The changing conditions cycling through snow, rain, and refreezing as well as the impact the wind has on the final result can create something very interesting.

Taking images at sunset or sunrise when it is cold enough to freeze the ocean can help create interesting images as well.

Create some memories of subjects you see in your community under abnormal conditions such as this fishing boat in the ice. If you know the owner you can always share the photo with them as well.

Equipment care: Taking your camera gear from a warm environment to the outside usually does not cause any issues, however when going from the cold back into a warm environment is where condensation can quickly form on your camera/lens and this is where it can be harmful to your gear eventually causing spots on your external and more seriously the internal lens elements which eventually causes mold. Before going in to a warm environment from the cold, place your camera/lens back inside your camera bag (your bag needs to be padded with zipper closed) this will allow your gear to raise in temperature slowly and therefore condensation will not happen. An additional protection tip is to put your camera/lens in a Ziploc bag, this will allow the condensation to form on the outside of the bag and not on your camera/lens.

Stay Warm: To enjoy your time out in the cold dress in layers with thermal socks for your feet and gloves that allow you to operate your camera and keep your hands warm. If you are in icy conditions use crampons or cleats on your boots, they will keep you from falling so you don’t get hurt or break your gear.

White balance is best set for the weather condition; use sunny, cloudy or custom. If you are not sure use auto but the result may not be as good (depending on your camera) as my previous suggestions.

Exposure: The challenge in taking a photograph in snow, frost or ice conditions is getting the right exposure. If you let your camera automatically pick the exposure you will immediately see that the snow, frost and ice is more gray than white. This is because the camera’s auto exposure is based on 18% gray, which is the amount of light reflected from a 50% gray surface. To solve gray looking snow, frost and ice, set your “exposure compensation” at +2. If you see the “highlight alert” on your display then back off the exposure compensation by -1/3 at a time until you no longer see the “highlight alert”. You will then have the proper exposure for shooting with snow or ice conditions.

The same exposure technique goes for manual mode, set your exposure until your camera meter shows +2. Then take a photo and see if you see any highlight alerts, if you do then back off the exposure by -1/3 increments until you no longer see any highlight alerts.

Your final best exposure for auto or manual exposure is usually closer to +2 than +1.

You can review the blog articles on exposure compensation and highlight alert if you need help.

Students are encouraged to develop their ability to tell a story or invoke an emotion, as well as how to plan and troubleshoot while creating their images. As such it’s important to not only create the image but to also include a “title”, and write a short paragraph about; how they came up with the idea, any interesting back ground that compelled them to make the image, and describe any techniques on how they overcame any obstacles.

As always with our monthly theme challenges we try to seek out an instructional resource, below are a number of YouTube video links to help with some hints and ideas.

Snow, Frost or Ice Photography instructional aids:
How to take amazing photos in the snow: by Gavin Hoey (3min 53sec)
Landscape Photography Tips & Techniques, Winter Freeze: by Thomas Heaton (15min 55sec)
Snow Landscape Photography Tips: by Micael Widell (10min 17sec)
Landscape Photography in the Snow, Winter in North Yorkshire by: First Man Photography (11min 5sec)

An important part of improving your photography is practice, which is one aspect of the monthly theme challenge, in addition you have an opportunity to learn about different genres, techniques and tips.

Episode 6 – Bob Pettipas, Dartmouth Nova Scotia

Podcast Episode #6 – Jan 15, 2022

In this podcast interview we will be talking to Bob Pettipas, a photographer based in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

You Can Learn Photography Podcast Episode 6 Bob Pettipas (mp3)
©Bob Pettipas

Bob is a photographer from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. He enjoys many genres of photography, such as; landscape, sunrise & sunset, night, long exposure, nature, and concert. Bob has been interested in photography for most of his life, and really started working on his photography skills since retirement about 6 years ago.

You can follow and/or interact with Bob on social media from the following links:
Facebook.com
Flickr.com
Instagram.com

The following links are not affiliate links and we are not sponsored by Amazon or the manufacturer of thee products. The lens warmer mentioned during the podcast can be found on Amazon.ca CooWoo Lens Heater. A suitable USB Power Bank to power the lens warmer can also be found on Amazon.ca INIU Power Bank 10000mAh

Click to view/download the pdf of Bob’s Milky-way Tips.

Bob mentioned during our conversation he found the Mike Browne YouTube Channel to be very helpful.

From your podcast app click on this link to the images which will automatically use your browser.

The Music snippets that you hear in the intro and outro of the podcast is from “upbeat-motivation-corporate” by M-Dewala on Pixabay Music.

January Theme Challenge – “Sheffield Mills Eagle Watch”

The Sheffield Mills Eagle Watch in Nova Scotia is held each year during the last weekend of January and the first weekend of February. You can visit during the week on your own when there are less visitors. 80% of the Poultry farmers are in this area for Nova Scotia and supply the Eagles with dead chickens each day. The Eagles are typically fed around 9:00-9:30am. There can be hundreds of Eagles at this location during the winter months. Many photographers and viewers come to see the Eagles every year. The Sheffield Mills Eagle Watch Viewing site is located at 1770 Middle Dyke Rd, Centreville, NS B0P 1J0 (45.15342713667335, -64.49383798667183).

This is an opportunity to see the majestic Bald Eagle, although this event has received criticism in recent years it is still very amazing to see and provides photographers with the ability to get fairly close to capture amazing images.

Part of being a photographer is creating images on assignment whether you are hired by someone or you have your own idea for an image that you have wanted to create by setting a goal for yourself to make it happen (self assignment). This month I encourage you to travel to Sheffield Mills to see the Bald Eagles in action. Create an image or a short video of the bald eagles. For tips on taking images of wildlife refer to the September 2020 theme challenge on backyard wildlife. Do some preparation by looking up the location on google maps (see above embedded map), check the weather forecast, make sure you are dressed for the cool temperatures and pack the camera gear you will need. Spend the time, the eagles don’t always come close right away, be patient and you will be rewarded with not only great images but you’ll also have an exciting experience. Don’t be intimidated by other photographers with expensive gear, use what you have and concentrate on getting the best images possible and don’t forget to enjoy the experience. Weather you have a kit 55-250mm lens or an iPhone you’ll be able to capture some images. Consider using your phone to take a video.

Here is an example video of a Bald Eagle eating in a tree. The video was taken with a Canon 7D and a telephoto lens.

If you do not live close enough to be able to visit Sheffield Mills you can still create an image for this months theme challenge by taking images of local wildlife.

Important note about looking after your camera gear in cold weather; Usually when you bring your camera gear from the cold into a warmer area such as a vehicle or building moisture will appear on your camera and lens which is not desirable. It is important to put your camera and lens into your insulated camera bag or tightly wrapped in an insulated blanket or jacket before getting into a vehicle or building. You can also use large ziplock bags (make sure the bag is properly sealed) while outside for your camera and lens so the moisture will accumulate on the bag and not your gear.

For some history of the Sheffield Mills Eagle watch check out my photo essay below. Also consider creating your own photo essay.

Below are a few sample images taken in 2020 and 2021.

f/8, 1/2000, ISO 640, @516mm
f/8, 1/2000, ISO 1600, @600mm

Students are encouraged to develop their ability to tell a story or invoke an emotion, as well as how to plan and troubleshoot while creating their images. As such it’s important to not only create the image but to also include a “title”, and write a short paragraph about; how they came up with the idea, any interesting back ground that compelled them to make the image, and describe any techniques on how they overcame any obstacles.

As always with our monthly theme challenges we try to seek out an instructional resource, below are some YouTube video links to help with some important tips, hints and ideas.
Birds of Prey Photography and iPhone Video instructional aids:
How to Photograph Eagles and Birds of Prey: by Tim Boyer Photography (15min 22sec)
10 AMAZING iPhone Videography Tips: by Think Media (11min 41sec)

An important part of improving your photography is practice, which is one aspect of the monthly theme challenge, in addition you have an opportunity to learn about different genres, techniques and tips.

Episode 5 – Chris Stackhouse, Bayswater, Nova Scotia

Podcast Episode #5 – Nov 15, 2021

In this podcast interview we will be talking to Chris Stackhouse, a professional photographer specializing in Prairie Landscape, Wave, and Fine Art Photography, currently based in Bayswater, Nova Scotia.

You Can Learn Photography Podcast Episode 5 – Chris Stackhouse (mp3)
©Chris Stackhouse

From an early age, growing up on the east coast of England, Chris was attracted to the essence of design, whether industrial or architectural. A talent for drawing and resourceful undertakings such as restoring old cars on a minimal budget led him to a career in civil, mechanical and piping design.

His skills, combined with a passion for the “open spaces” brought him to Calgary in 1981 ostensibly to work in the oil and gas industry. Out and about in his spare time, Chris became hooked on the prairie landscapes and their relatively gentle interactions with modern civilization.

Self-taught in all endeavors, Chris began to explore photography while pursuing a number of freelance careers such as residential construction and renovations, property management and sportfishing guiding.

It was a fateful day whilst listening to a radio program in 1998 when the realization of a radical change to the prairie landscape manifested itself to Chris. Here was a story of the rapid demise of those ghost-like sentinels of the prairie landscape, wooden grain elevators; the very living soul of human presence on the prairies was disappearing forever.

Inspired with a passion to become a photographic archivalist of those passing’s, Chris went on to spend 12 years systematically visiting and photographing most of the remaining wooden elevators across Western Canada and many from the United States.

2004 Marked the beginning of Chris’s acknowledgement of his photographic achievements and skills with his first photo exhibition, a very successful solo show entitled “End of the Line” that featured 59 prairie images. Since that time Chris has continued to exhibit his work every year, expanding his portfolio to include a unique style of ocean waves imagery, a large collection of European church doors, abstracts, panoramic landscapes and Mexican Life.

His images have been published in many magazines and papers with showings at the Calgary Stampede, Beall Park Art Center in Bozeman, Montana, Sooke Fine Arts Show, Artspring Art Center and Galleons Lap Photo Gallery on Saltspring Island, British Columbia.

Currently Chris lives on the south shore of Nova Scotia, continuing to explore and look for unique subject matter and photographing the great outdoors throughout the east coast of North America.

Visit Chris and learn more at: chrisstackhouse.com

From your podcast app click on this link to the images which will automatically use your browser.

The Music snippets that you hear in the intro and outro of the podcast is from “upbeat-motivation-corporate” by M-Dewala on Pixabay Music.

November Theme Challenge – Blue

f/8, 1/200, ISO 100, @100mm

We had some computer problems this month limiting the time to put this challenge together, good thing we have OS mirrored backups using Macrium Reflect free version which allowed us to recover the “C:” drive and get one of our systems up and working again. (This is not a sponsored add but just wanted to say it’s a great product).

We are going to keep the challenge simple this month as we will be making photos of subjects that are the colour “Blue”. It might still be a bit of a challenge finding “Blue” subjects with all the autumn colour still left, but I am sure you’ll be able to find appropriate subjects.

With this challenge you can either stay inside and do some still life photography or head outdoors and seek out some subjects to photograph.

Below are examples to spark some ideas.

Still Life; The “Blue” mailman toy above was shot using flash and a snoot, however you can accomplish the same thing with a table lamp and a piece of white paper to roll into a cone to create a DIY snoot (just remember to use an LED bulb in the lamp to keep the temperature down because we don’t want the paper to burn). You’ll have to photograph your image at night and use a tripod or something to put your camera on to keep it stable and use the 2 second self timer mode as your shutter speeds will be low. The concept was to light the mailman as if he were lit with lights on a stage. Because the light will be harsh position the toy to minimize the shadows on the face and body to make any remaining shadows pleasing. I hope you have as much fun as I did creating a similar image.

Vehicles; There are many vehicles out there that are blue, but find something unique and take your time with the composition including thinking about the focal length that best suits the situation. With the old blue trunk on the left it was shot using a zoom lens at 50mm which meant being a bit closer to the truck to exclude a lot of the background. With the car it was shot from across the street with a zoom lens at 180mm so the composition would include the street light, tree(s), sidewalk and house to enhance the image. Focal length does make a difference so think about it when composing your image to maximize the story/impact.

Boats; In the image below there was a blue boat tied off the wharf just begging to be photographed. Embracing the orange and red colours of the trees and the building it helps make the blue boat stand out in the image.

The Blue Hour; Not only finding blue subjects but shooting them during the blue hour can create solid images as well. This image is a bit busy but there is the rule of odds (three blue boats), reflections due to the calm water, and the pink sky providing a contrast in colour to the image.

let’s see what images you create this month and have some fun.

Students are encouraged to develop their ability to tell a story or invoke an emotion, as well as how to plan and troubleshoot while creating their images. As such it’s important to not only create the image but to also include a “title”, and write a short paragraph about; how they came up with the idea, any interesting back ground that compelled them to make the image, and describe any techniques on how they overcame any obstacles.

An important part of improving your photography is practice, which is one aspect of the monthly theme challenge, in addition you have an opportunity to learn about different genres, techniques and tips.

Episode 4 – John Burnett, Bridgewater, Nova Scotia

Podcast Episode #4 – Oct 15, 2021

In this podcast interview we will be talking to John Burnett, a photographer based in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia.

You Can Learn Photography Podcast Episode 4 – John Burnett (mp3)
©John Burnett

For me, photography provides a creative outlet, a form of rejuvenating therapy, and a contemplative exercise. I love the outdoors and new places and I’ll often simply photograph the picturesque and interesting scenes in front of me. At the same time, I’m keen to make images that transcend time and place, evoke emotions or memories, or provoke a new thought. If I’ve made an image or written something that strikes a chord with you, then I am pleased.

I was an avid photographer in the 1970’s, but the hobby fell by the wayside with life’s obligations. I began photographing again late in 2003 with a purchase of one of the first consumer-priced DSLR’s.

Visit John and learn more at: jburnett.ca
You can also find John on social media at: flickr.com/photos/burnettjn

From your podcast app click on this link to the images which will automatically use your browser.

The Music snippets that you hear in the intro and outro of the podcast is from “upbeat-motivation-corporate” by M-Dewala on Pixabay Music.

October Theme Challenge – Resilience

f/16, 1/13, ISO 100, @24mm

This month we will be trying to evoke emotion in our images by seeking out subjects that show “resilience”.

From the Webster Dictionary; resilience – an ability to recover from or adjust easily to misfortune or change”.

Now not every subject would show the ability to recover easily, in many cases it is, could, or would have been hard and/or take a long time to recover from a difficult situation.

Take the plant that is growing on the side of this building, for instance, it’s something you don’t expect to see. You wonder how it grew, how long it took and how it’s able to stay attached to the building. It provides a bit of mystery to the image.

Many things can be thought of as resilient. Although the examples shown below are subjects that can be found easily in our daily environment there can be a deeper meaning to resilience such as; the impact on people, nature, infrastructure and the economy due to climate change, or the impact on people due to a lock down caused by a global pandemic such as Covid-19, and even the impact on people due to terrorism, civil unrest or a war. Images to express this type of resilience would typically be portrayed in a photo journalistic manner and in most cases require a collection of images to convey the story or invoke a call to action. Portraying this type of resilience is beyond the scope of this monthly theme.

Below are just some examples for ideas.

Rocks with Plants/Trees; With plants/trees growing out of rock crevices, how do they get enough nutrients to survive in this situation? How big will they grow and how long will they last? These are just some of the questions or feelings your images could say. There are many opportunities for this type of image, so just go out with your camera and keep an open mind.

Animals; Many animals work all day long gathering enough food to eat to just survive. The Kingfisher shown, for example, captured a field mouse which are in their diet but you typically see them diving for fish, however in the wild they eat when they can and what they can. The seal resting on the rock has a scarred tail, maybe from a boat or from fishing gear, but it is still surviving. The Owl hunts in any kind of weather because it needs to eat to stay alive. The Mother fox still has to get enough nourishment to feed it’s young, it must be difficult to feed so many pups. Go out as often as possible to see what you can find.

Life where you least expect it; How does a tree die and then a new tree start growing out of it? Even an apple tree growing out of the beach rocks, again how is that possible. As you find these types of subjects it will make you even more aware of your surrounding environment and maybe leave you in awe of nature.

Man Made Structures; Up to this point we have discussed living things, however man made structures can last a long time even though they show their wear. The image of the Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse before it was recently painted, shows how these icons of the rugged shoreline have survived for many many years providing a beacon of safety for the ships that passed by. Many old barns still stand even after many years of neglect, it makes you wonder how they were constructed to be so resilient.

Stretch your mind and let’s see what images you create this month.

Students are encouraged to develop their ability to tell a story or invoke an emotion, as well as how to plan and troubleshoot while creating their images. As such it’s important to not only create the image but to also include a “title”, and write a short paragraph about; how they came up with the idea, any interesting back ground that compelled them to make the image, and describe any techniques on how they overcame any obstacles.

An important part of improving your photography is practice, which is one aspect of the monthly theme challenge, in addition you have an opportunity to learn about different genres, techniques and tips.

Episode 3 – Ian Proctor, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Podcast Episode #3 – Sep 15, 2021

In this podcast interview we will be talking to Ian Proctor, a family and portrait photographer based in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

You Can Learn Photography Podcast Episode 3 – Ian Proctor (mp3)
©Ian Proctor

Born and raised in Montreal, Ian started his photography journey in High School as a Yearbook Photographer. When he was 18 he moved to Calgary Alberta where he started work in the Oil and Gas sector and spent 43 years, raising a family and continuing his photographic education.

Since 2008 Ian has been working as a semi-professional Family and Portrait photographer and made the leap to full time in 2020 when he relocated to Halifax in the middle of the pandemic.

Since moving to Halifax Ian has concentrated his focus on portrait work but has still found some time to explore Nova Scotia as his new home and is building a body of work with the focus on coastal imagery.

Ian is a proud member of the OFFBEAT Community, a creative group of Canadian Photographers that was founded by Dave Brosha and Paul Zizka.

When not working as a photographer, Ian can be found trying to find a good pick up shinny session at the local rink or walking the neighbourhood pathways trying to get his daily steps in!

Visit Ian and learn more at: ianproctor.ca (Portrait and Family work), or spiritphotography.ca (Landscape work).

You can also find Ian on social media at:
▀   facebook.com/ianproctor.ca
▀   @ianproctorphotography.

From your podcast app click on this link to the images which will automatically use your browser.

The Music snippets that you hear in the intro and outro of the podcast is from “upbeat-motivation-corporate” by M-Dewala on Pixabay Music.

September Theme Challenge – “Water”

f/11, 1/100, ISO 640, @150mm

This month I encourage you to use water in your images. Water can either be the subject or be used to help add more interest to your images, for example the grass and sky reflection in the calm water shown in this photo.

Water can be calm which allows the use of reflections to add more interest to your image, or be turbulent created by water movement, wind or storms. Water can also be in the form of rain or artificial form a water hose as an example.

Just think of all the creative possibilities that water can bring to your images.

Below are only some examples for ideas.

Waterfalls; Now that the rainy season has begun, you now have the opportunity to photograph some water falls. Remember to not only capture the entire waterfall but also to isolate some detail using a longer focal length lens to get capture that dreamy image. It doesn’t matter if the waterfall is big or small there is always an image to be made while at the same time enjoying the sounds of the water and wildlife. Refer to the November 2020 Waterfall Theme Challenge for some additional ideas and techniques.

Waves; Now that the hurricane season has begun there is an opportunity to capture some large wave activity, just keep safety in mind when you are close to the shoreline it can be very dangerous. Just use a longer focal length lens and stay back a safe distance and its a good idea to have someone come along with you. You can also capture some unique images of the waves created by a boat, with the image from the wake of a boat at golden hour you can end up with a timeless photograph. It’s also possible to use slower shutter speeds and use a panning technique following the wave to create something a bit different, a slower shutter speed of around 1/15 sec or slower and place yourself along side the waves instead of in front. Refer to the December 2019 Seascapes Theme Challenge for some additional ideas and techniques.

Long Exposure; To obtain a long exposure we need to lower our shutter speed which can be a challenge if you do not have some of the special equipment required such as a tripod, remote trigger, and ND (Neutral Density) filters. If you do not have ND filters the slower shutter speeds can be more easily obtained when the lighting conditions are low, such as in the early morning or late in the day when the sun is below the horizon which is referred to as civil twilight. This is when the sky can light up and be completely magical. The ISO is typically set to 100, with shutter speeds from 0.5sec to 5sec and an appropriate small aperture f/11 – f/16 to help obtain the right exposure and for the appropriate depth of field. For the streaks as the water is receding you need to pick the right time to press the shutter. If you do not have a remote trigger you can use the 2sec timer function in your camera it just takes a bit of practice to get used to when to push the shutter.

Water Drops; You can take advantage of photographing subjects with water drops on them after a rainfall such as flowers, windows, or flat colorful surfaces. Capturing water drop splashes can also be a lot of fun to try and there are many ways to accomplish these type of photos even with out special equipment. Take the time to watch the videos below about water drop photography which cover a DIY method and with using special equipment. There are many ways to do this with minimal gear but it does take patience so have fun giving it a try.

Stretch your creativity and let’s see what images you create this month.

Students are encouraged to develop their ability to tell a story or invoke an emotion, as well as how to plan and troubleshoot while creating their images. As such it’s important to not only create the image but to also include a “title”, and write a short paragraph about; how they came up with the idea, any interesting back ground that compelled them to make the image, and describe any techniques on how they overcame any obstacles.

As always with our monthly theme challenges we try to seek out an instructional resource, below shows YouTube video links to help with some important tips, hints, ideas, or just something to think about.
Water Photography instructional aids:
How to Get Started with Long Exposure Photography by: Mark Denney (15min 26sec)
How To Photograph Water Drops At Home by: Gavin Hoey (6min 53sec)
How to Do Water Drop Photography, Testing the MIOPS Splash Kit by: First Man Photography (18min 21sec)

An important part of improving your photography is practice, which is one aspect of the monthly theme challenge, in addition you have an opportunity to learn about different genres, techniques and tips.